Finding balance in life does not mean avoiding extremes

Finding balance in life does not mean avoiding extremes!

Finding balance in life does not mean avoiding extremesby Jacquie Wise

Sages through the ages have advocated the ‘Middle Way’. The ‘Golden Mean’ and the ‘Straight and Narrow Path’.  The moral of many children’s stories (such as Goldilocks and the Three Bears) is to avoid extremes and choose the balance in life that is ‘just right’.

We often end up going to extremes to avoid going to extremes!

Here’s a happy thought:  Having balance is having the ability to explore extremes at times and having the wisdom and awareness to pay attention to the opposite extreme.

Let’s take, as an example, a scale from zero to ten, with zero being the  balance point between two extremes at either end of the scale.

10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-/0/+1+2+3+4+5+6+7+8+9+10

At the minus ten end, let’s say you’re totally lazy and, at the plus ten end, you’re working like a maniac.

Balance does not have to mean battling to stay around the middle range of five.   Sometimes, you need to work ridiculously long hours to complete a project.  At other times, the overwork switches to the other end of the scale of ‘over-rest’.  Going from one extreme to the other can be the best way, as long as you remember to go to the other end of the scale as often as possible.

Taking another example:  you over-indulge, (minus ten) then feel guilty and go to the plus ten end, with extreme diets and exercise plans that you can’t keep up.  Achieving balance, in this instance, might mean see-sawing between one day of indulging and one day of healthy eating and exercise.

There’s a third example worth mentioning, because so many of us find it difficult to control our emotions.  Sally is aware that she has gets into bad moods when she’s stressed, which is very unpleasant for her boyfriend.  By trying to suppress her temper, she only manages to simmer for longer periods and get into filthy moods that drag out.

Using this see-saw system, she learnt to release her temper. By allowing her emotions full range, Sally was better able to let go and be the serene, controlled person she wanted to be. This brought her more often to the zero, balanced position.

Of course, she also had to learn to discuss her concerns with her boyfriend and find a way to compromise. That meant there were fewer reasons for her to lose her temper.

Over time, we remain in balance as long as we work both ends of the scale and keep returning to the centre.

Imagine how you would feel if you were able to effectively create balance in your life. Interested? If so, contact me directly to arrange a convenient appointment time.


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If you or someone you know would like a personal consultation, please call +61 3 9690 8159.

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